Sammy Tramp: The 'Artful Masher'

Practicing new cane combos to the smooth sounds of Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett’s, ‘The Lady is a Tramp.’

Floating suitcase. In New Orleans.

Hat trick practice.

Hat tricks!

Magic

Very dangerous trick. Not for the faint of heart.

black-celluloid:

Eleanor Dell a performer in Ziegfeld Follies Midnight Frolic c.1920s

black-celluloid:

Eleanor Dell a performer in Ziegfeld Follies Midnight Frolic c.1920s

1914. 2014. 100 years of slapstick and stank faces. You changed the world, Charlie! Your legacy will live on forever.

1914. 2014. 100 years of slapstick and stank faces. You changed the world, Charlie! Your legacy will live on forever.

fuckyeahchaplin:

Charlie Chaplin c.1914 

fuckyeahchaplin:

Charlie Chaplin c.1914 

Urchin Couture. The Seven Secret Plays of Madam Caprice: A Live Music Theatrical Adventure

Urchin Couture. The Seven Secret Plays of Madam Caprice: A Live Music Theatrical Adventure

Hey-a fella, don’t be a chump. Give yourself a dapper bump. Stop all that talking and suit the f*ck up. 
New old hat, new old cane, freshly tailored vest, tails, spats, altered tie to cravat, special Sammy pinky gloves, cameo, and cameo.

Hey-a fella, don’t be a chump. Give yourself a dapper bump. Stop all that talking and suit the f*ck up.
New old hat, new old cane, freshly tailored vest, tails, spats, altered tie to cravat, special Sammy pinky gloves, cameo, and cameo.

Hey-a fella, don’t be a chump. Give yourself a dapper bump. Stop all that talking and suit the f*ck up.

Hey-a fella, don’t be a chump. Give yourself a dapper bump. Stop all that talking and suit the f*ck up.

deviatesinc:

1926

A Brief History of Romantic Friendship

by 

“Smashes,” “crushes,” “spoons,” and other curious nineteenth-century relationship varieties.

What amplified the impact of that progress, beyond the raw material of academia, were young women’s relationships with each other and the ecosystem of those relationships, which created “a healthy and productive separatism.” This allowed them to explore their own boundaries, to build their own hierarchy of values, to try on the roles of leaders in a self-contained universe free from the traditional yardsticks of society and from the pressure of male demands. But there was one especially potent driver of this empowerment — romantic friendships, which were referred to in college slang as “smashes,” “crushes,” or “spoons.”

In 1873, a Yale student newspaper described the phenomenon in terms that bespeak either utter obliviousness to the sexual undertones of these relationships or nonchalant acceptance of them:

When a Vassar girl takes a shine to another, she straightway enters upon a regular course of bouquet sendings, interspersed with tinted notes, mysterious packages of “Ridley’s Mixed Candies,” locks of hair perhaps, and many other tender tokens, until at last the object of her attentions is captured, the two women become inseparable, and the aggressor is considered by her circle of acquaintances as —smashed.

Vassar, as it happens, was not only the university where Maria Mitchell had begun teaching as the only woman on the faculty, paving the way for women in science, but also where Edna St. Vincent Millay became “smashed” with another woman and penned for her some of the most enchanting queer love letters of all time.

Institutions like Vassar and Smith regularly held all-female dances in the early twentieth century. A Cosmopolitanmagazine article from 1901 on life in women’s colleges describes Smith’s Freshman Frolic, in which a sophomore girl played “the cavalier” for the freshman girl she escorted:

She sends her flowers, calls for her, fills her order of dance, fetches ices and frappes between dances and takes her to supper… Every “soph” sees her partner home, begs for a flower … and if the freshman has taken advantage of the opportunity and made the desired hit, there are dates for future meetings and jollifications and a good night over the balusters, as lingering and cordial as any the “freshie” has left behind. And if the gallant soph who lives in another hall runs away from her shadow on the way back to her dormitory, it’s nobody’s business but her own.

Despite the reluctance of the era’s writers to detail that aspect, Faderman notes that such courtship rituals often led to “lovemaking,” both in the 19th-century sentimental sense and in the modern meaning of sexual intimacy. She marvels at the fault line between the oblivious and the obvious:

How could such excitements not lead to passionate loves at a time when there was not yet widespread stigma against intense female same-sex relationships?

What’s more, young college women’s romantic friendships were modeled heavily after the relationships between their female professors, who resided on campus, usually in pairs, often forming lifelong love relationships — “marriages,” like that of Charity and Sylvia. They also provided a new model of economic independence — wholly self-supporting, they didn’t need to marry in order to survive.

Once college-educated women began entering the workforce, the romantic friendship took place against a new backdrop, which Katherine Anne Porter once described as “a company of Amazons” — those early professional women, the first generations of female doctors, professors, ministers, union organizers, and social workers. Faderman cites the case of two Englishwomen from the 1890s, Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper, a pair of “romantic friends” who penned some 25 plays and eight books of poetry together under the pseudonym Michael Field, vowing to each other to be “poets and lovers evermore.”

But it didn’t take long for the cultural establishment to begin fearing romantic friendships as a threat to the traditional institution of marriage, which was still a pivotal part of society’s economic model. By the early 1900s, Faderman notes, sexologists and other newly anointed “experts” in the social sciences began condemning these relationships, which only a decade earlier had been universally accepted as innocuous and even ennobling. An 1895 book titled Side Talks with Girls cautioned that it was dangerous for a woman to have “a girl-sweetheart” because wasting her love on another woman would leave nothing for “Prince Charming when he comes to claim his bride.” One pseudo-medical text from the beginning of the century admonished against women’s “increasing affection” for one another:

They kiss each other fondly on every occasion. They embrace each other with mutual satisfaction. It is most natural, in the interchange of visits, for them to sleep together. They learn the pleasure of direct contact, and in the course of them fondling they resort to cunni-linguistic practices… After this the normal sex act fails to satisfy [them].

By 1906, one Swiss psychiatrist issued the alarmist statement that “the excess of female inverts exceeds those of the male” and that for female lovers, sexual lust “is their one thought, night and day, almost without interruption.”